Tuesday 07 April 2020

Latest News

Latest News                                

Analysis of Local Authority costs and pressures incurred in support of Former Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Child Care Leavers in the East Midlands

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EMC has produced an analysis of local authority costs and pressures incurred in support of former Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Child (UASC) Care Leavers in the East Midlands. The report confirms the actual costs incurred by councils in the East Midlands in providing Leaving Care services to former UASC aged 18-24, and forms a companion paper to our report in 2017 establishing the costs to Local Authorities in providing care to UASC (under 18s).

This research demonstrates a substantial shortfall in former UASC care leaver funding. The average cost to local authorities in providing Leaving Care services to former UASC was found to be £16,602 per former UASC care leaver per year. With a weighted average Home Office reimbursement per former UASC care leaver of £6,117 per annum, a current funding shortfall of £10,485 per former UASC care leaver per year has been identified. In other words, present Home Office funding covers 37% of local authority Leaving Care costs on average.

The report also includes future population modelling that incorporates the estimated impact of the new Leaving Care duties under the Children & Social Work Act 2017, and projects a growth in the former UASC care leaver cohort of between 43% and 146% over 5 years across the region. When the shortfall for unaccompanied asylum seeking children in care is factored in, there is a predicted funding gap to the region of between £11m – £15m by 2024.

#LookCloser

Exploited children & young people don't always look vulnerable and may not act like victims'. 

The Children's Society is running a campaign from 9th-13th March 2020 as part of their Prevention Programme, working with British Transport Police, East Midlands Special Operations Unit and Forces region-wide to launch the campaign.

Why #LookCloser? 

We know that public transport such as trams, coaches, trains and buses are used to facilitate the movement of a young person when they are being exploited, that fast food outlets and roadside services may be used for amenities and food stops, and hotels may be places where exploitation is occurring ‘behind closed doors’.

For each child or young person who is being exploited there will be different members of the public and staff working in the service industry who may see them and be in a position to protect them.  However, they may be unaware of the signs that this person may be being exploited and need help…

Read their full blog here, or follow the link to more information about the look closer campaign https://www.childrenssociety.org.uk/look-closer where there are a resources to help spot the signs and #lookcloser

Follow the activities happening over the week by searching #lookcloser on twitter or visit @SMP_EastMids @childrenssociety, @BTP, @EMSpecialOps

Quarterly Migration Briefing - December 2019

Each quarter, the East Midlands Strategic Migration Partnership publish a briefing that brings together different sources of information relating to Asylum Seekers, Refugees and Migrants, as well as upcoming training and events.

If you would like to recieve this briefing, please contact Hannah.Smith@emcouncils.gov.uk 

The next Briefing will be published in March 2020.

Quarterly Migration Briefing - September 2019

Each quarter, the East Midlands Strategic Migration Partnership publish a briefing that brings together different sources of information relating to Asylum Seekers, Refugees and Migrants, as well as upcoming training and events.

If you would like to recieve this briefing, please contact Hannah.Smith@emcouncils.gov.uk 

The next Briefing will be published in December 2019.

New global resettlement scheme for the most vulnerable refugees announced

In June 2019, the Government announced that the UK will continue to resettle thousands of refugees under a new scheme set to start in 2020, the Home Secretary announced.  For further details, click here.

EMSMP's update on the new global scheme

The East Midlands Strategic Migration Partnership is working with the Home Office, LGA, local authorities and other key stakeholders to put in place the arrangements to house and support refugees as the process emerges. The cost of supporting the refugees in their first year in Britain will be funded from foreign aid spending. The Migration pages of the East Midlands Councils website will be updated as we progress. Information is also available on the LGA website Refugees | Local Government Association

In response to public offers of accommodation, in the first instance, council private sector housing teams might want to collate the details so that once we have further information from government on who will be arriving in the UK and when, you can assess whether you can make use of their offer to provide housing. For the many other offers (such as local people wanting to make a donation or offer assistance in kind) you may want to direct people to the local and national charities which are offering support to refugees already in the UK. This will ensure that the support provided is tailored to vulnerable people's needs in the most appropriate way. Significant or substantive offers of assistance can be referred to the Home Office.

ESOL in the East Midlands 2018 Report

EMSMP in conjunction with EMFEC undertook a report in 2018 to map current ESOL provision within the East Midlands. For several years, East Midlands Strategic Migration Partnership, has highlighted the lack of availability and access to English language tuition for speakers of other languages, as a barrier to integration and employment for migrants in the region. EMC has since worked with EMFEC to produce a comprehensive review to better understand ESOL provision, to highlight gaps in provision and to share best practice.

 The report demonstrates the challenges of delivering ESOL to a diverse population and in   particular the needs of refugees resettled under the Government’s Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme (VPRS). Key recommendations and conclusions will provide the focus for further action and include:

  • Effectively planning for the provision of ESOL in each area. EMC and its partners will look to set   up partnerships of ESOL stake holders and providers.
  • Encouraging ESOL providers to offer greater flexibility through harnessing new technologies and innovative ways to delivering learning.
  • Consider establishing a regional guidance and referral agency, such as the Nottingham ‘begin model’ - to act as a central co-ordination point for ESOL.
  • EMC and emfec will commit to work with local authorities, LEPs, ESOL providers, voluntary and community sector and refugees themselves. This is in order to take forward the recommendations and to support the provision of infrastructure - to better meet the needs of new migrants and refugees across the region.

Analysis of Local Authority costs incurred in support of Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children in the East Midlands 2017

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In June 2017, EMSMP have produced a report on the Analysis of Local Authority Cost incurred in suport of Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children in the East Midlands. The following report confirms the actual costs incurred by Local Authorities in the East Midlands in providing care for Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children (UASC). 

This research demonstrates a significant gap in UASC funding. The results of the financial analysis above give an average cost to local authorities supporting UASC in their care as £55,194 per UASC per annum. By comparison with the weighted average Home Office reimbursement per UASC per annum of £30,231, a current funding shortfall to East Midlands local authorities of £24,963 per UASC per annum can be identified. In other words, present Home Office funding levels cover just over half (54.8%) of the costs incurred by local authorities in support of the current UASC cohort.